Regent Park Goes Green

Regent Park Goes Green

April 28, 2008

Toronto Community Housing is making the new Regent Park green and environmentally conscious. One way is by building the new Regent Park Community Energy System. It will provide clean reliable and competitively-priced heating, cooling and hot water to all buildings in Regent Park while reducing the emission of greenhouse gases by 8,000 tonnes a year during phase one of the neighbourhood revitalization. The 30-year savings will be about 400,000 tonnes. That's the equivalent of taking more than 66,000 cars off the road for a year.

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Left to right: Martin Blake, Daniels Corporation; Derek Ballantyne, CEO, Toronto Community Housing, Councillor Pam McConnell.

Toronto Community Housing is making the new Regent Park green and environmentally conscious. One way is by building the new Regent Park Community Energy System. It will provide clean reliable and competitively-priced heating, cooling and hot water to all buildings in Regent Park while reducing the emission of greenhouse gases by 8,000 tonnes a year during phase one of the neighbourhood revitalization. The 30-year savings will be about 400,000 tonnes. That's the equivalent of taking more than 66,000 cars off the road for a year.

On Wednesday April 23, Toronto Community Housing, along with its development partner in phase one of Regent Park, The Daniels Corporation and local Councillor Pam McConnell, invited the media to visit the innovative Community Energy System.

The system is a campus system. The boilers and chillers are located in the base of the 22-storey Toronto Community Housing building at the corner of Dundas and Sackville Streets. A distribution system of insulated underground pipes will deliver heating, cooling and hot water to buildings throughout Regent Park.

The Community Energy System is very adaptable and it will allow Toronto Community Housing to seamlessly add or switch to renewable sources of energy, like solar or geothermal power.

The Regent Park Community Energy System has the future potential to connect to buildings outside the Regent Park development, to provide them with heating, cooling and hot water.

Future plans also call for the generation of clean electricity. The use of cogeneration could produce up to five megawatts of power. It will be used to power Toronto Community Housing buildings. There is also the potential to sell excess electricity to the Ontario power grid through Toronto Hydro.